Sex during Pregnancy

If your pregnancy is normal, having sex is a natural and normal aspect of it. The baby is safe since your abdomen and the uterus's muscular walls are protecting it from penetration and the movement of the intercourse.

Sex During Pregnancy: Is It Safe? | Pampers

Sex during Pregnancy

 

It's common for pregnant women and their partners to question if having sex is safe while pregnant. Can it lead to miscarriage? Will it hurt the developing child? Should certain sex positions be avoided? What you should know is as follows.

 

Is it safe during pregnancy?

 

If your pregnancy is normal, having sex is a natural and normal aspect of it. The baby is safe since your abdomen and the uterus's muscular walls are protecting it from penetration and the movement of the intercourse. Additionally, the fluid of the amniotic sac cushions your baby.

Orgasmic contractions differ from labor contractions in several ways. However, some medical professionals advise against having sex in the latter weeks of pregnancy as a general safety measure because they think that prostaglandins, which are substances found in semen, might cause contractions. Women who are past due and wish to induce birth can be an exception. Due to the fact that the gel used to "ripen" the cervix and trigger labor also includes prostaglandins, some doctors think that the prostaglandins in semen really cause labor in a full-term or past-due pregnancy. However, other medical professionals believe that the semen and labor relationship is only a hypothesis and that having intercourse does not start labor.

 

When not to have sex during pregnancy?

 

Whether it is safe to have sex when you are pregnant should be discussed with your doctor. If you are pregnant and have one of the high-risk conditions listed below, they might advise against having sex:

 

  • You have a history of miscarriages or are at risk of miscarriage.
  • Preterm labor is a possibility for you (contractions before 37 weeks of pregnancy)
  • You have vaginal bleeding, discharge, or cramps for no apparent reason.
  • Your amniotic sac is leaking fluid or has membranes that have broken.
  • You have an early pregnancy cervix opening.
  • The placenta in your uterus is too low.

 

Remember that if your doctor advises against having sex, this might apply to any activity that causes orgasm or sexual excitement, not simply intimate contact. So that you understand what they mean, talk it through.

If you have strange sensations during or after intercourse, such as:

 

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Fluid or discharge
  • Significant discomfort
  • Contractions

 

Pregnancy Sex

 

Every woman's pregnancy is unique, and this includes how she feels about sex.

Some women report losing their libido while pregnant. When they are pregnant, some women feel more intimately connected to and stimulated by their sexuality.

As your body changes throughout pregnancy, it's common for your sexual urge to fluctuate. As your tummy increases, you could feel self-conscious. Or having bigger, fuller breasts could make you feel sexier. Another benefit is not having to bother about birth control.

Share your feelings and what works with your spouse. You might need to experiment with several positions, especially later in your pregnancy, to find one that is exciting and comfortable for you. Change what you're doing if anything doesn't seem right for either of you, and discuss any physical issues with your OB.

 

After the fourth month of pregnancy, stay away from the "missionary position," which involves laying flat on your back. By doing this, you can prevent the increasing baby's weight from causing major blood arteries to tighten.

 

In our book – The Erotic Journey of the Seven Graduates, our grads, none of them are pregnant. But understand the complication involved in sex during pregnancy. 


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